Mr Los Angeles Leather Season

LA Leather Season is here…!!!

As last year ToFF is donating beautiful Tom of Finland memorabilia to the Mr. LA Leather Season and this year the ToFF is nominated in three categories at the South Land Honors Awards in conjunction to the Mr. L.A. Leather weekend.
Durk Dehner is nominated for “Mentor of the Year”.
The Foundation is nominated for “Club/Organization of the Year”.
Tom’s Bar is nominated for ” Event of the year”

The ToFF support of last years Mr. L.A. Leather Class 2010 has brought out this recognition on all the work the Foundation did all of last year with the Mr LA Leather Season and The Los Angeles Band of Brothers.

This year we look forward to be part of Leather Season once more, we have created the packages that will be donated and given at each contest as they take place from now till Mr LAL Weekend and South Land Honors on the weekend of March 25th & 26th
The night of the SLH Awards is the night of the 25th of March and you can get info by visiting the link below:

http://www.mrlaleather.com/southlandhonors/index.html

Mr LAL Contest is the night of the 26th of March and you can get further info by visiting the link below:

http://www.mrlaleather.com/

here you can see a couple of pics of the packages been donated by the Foundation to the Mr LAL Class of 2011

2011-01-15_14-38-43_744-1-300x1692011-01-15_14-39-00_483-300x1692011-01-15_14-38-30_236-300x169

Love & Peace in Brotherhood

Louie Pacheco Saenz
President, Los Angeles Band of Brothers
American Leatherman 2010
Mr CSW Leather 2010 & 2011

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Revisiting the Culture Wars and Looking Ahead

Using the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Arts’ “decency clause,” National Coalition Against Censorship initiated a conversation about the arts and their place in society today. Two panels, organized in collaboration with the Vera List Center for Art and Politics, brought together survivors of the culture wars and culture workers who are coming to creative maturity today. The story went like this: once upon a time artists and arts organizations could depend on government grants that gave them room to experiment and explore ideas, perhaps even to try and change the world, but public arts funding was relentlessly attacked.

Conservative legislators crucified the work of controversial artists on the Senate floor, and the NEA was forced to become an agency funding mainly “safe” programs. The good news is artists today still believe they are changing the world and they still create work that questions certainties (albeit with the awareness that it may be attacked, even censored). They no longer, however, have public funding as an option, and institutions that depend on public funding are all too much aware of the strings attached. As the “decency” clause targeted primarily work dealing with sexuality, the live events concluded with a screening and discussion of films challenging taboos around the representation of sex (co-sponsored by the BFA Department of Visual & Critical Studies at the School of Visual Arts). The conversation continues online through an ongoing series of video interviews with artists and curators worldwide, Power, Taboo and the Artist.

[In 1990, Congress amended the statute governing the National Endowment for the Arts to require that the NEA chairperson consider “general standards of respect and decency for the diverse beliefs and values of the American public” when awarding art grants. Four artists—Karen Finley, John Fleck, Holly Hughes and Tim Miller, known collectively as the “NEA 4″—sued in federal court, claiming the so-called “decency clause” violated the First Amendment and forced artists to engage in self-censorship in order to obtain NEA funding.

The Supreme Court, in 1998, upheld the “decency” standard for federal grants to the arts, which requires the NEA to take into account “general standards of decency and respect for the diverse beliefs and values of the American public” when making grants. But the 8 to 1 decision held that the “decency” standard is only advisory, and cannot be used to censor controversial art or ideas. Justice Souter, the lone dissenter, said the “decency” clause violates the First Amendment: “A statute disfavoring speech that fails to respect Americans’ diverse beliefs and values’ is the very model of viewpoint discrimination.]

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Calling All Caterers

Do you, or someone you know, operate a catering business that’s hungry for some good exposure?

As we prepare for the opening night gala for the 16th annual West Hollywood / Los Angeles Erotic Art Weekend on March 25, we are searching for someone willing to help provide hors d’oeuvres for this fun and exciting event.

Guests will include delegates from the Finish Consulate, members of the West Hollywood and Los Angeles’ city councils, as well as, gallery owners, professional and aspiring artists, and members of the general public. This is a fantastic opportunity to promote a new business or gain some great publicity for an established one.
Please respond here, or contact Bo at 760 672 3923.

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