Hey, everybody loves it. Where can I see the movie?

CONTINUES IN:
NYC – Quad Cinema
Philadelphia – Landmark Ritz at the Bourse
Baltimore – Parkway Theatre
Dallas – Angelika Film Center

OPENS 8th DECEMBER
Denver – Landmark Chez Artiste
Washington DC – Landmark E Street Cinema
Atlanta – Landmark Midtown Art Cinema
Minneapolis – Landmark Lagoon Cinema
Kansas City – Tivoli Cinemas
Houston – AMC Houston 8
New OrleansChalmette Movies

OPENS 9th DECEMBER
Vancouver – Vancity Theater
NYCRoxy Cinema

OPENS 10th DECEMBER
Hartford – Cinestudio

12th DECEMBER
Norfolk, VA – Naro Cinema

OPENS 15th DECEMBER
Boston – Landmark Kendall Square Cinema

OPENS 5th JANUARY
Chicago – Gene Siskel Film Center of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Columbus  – Wexner Center for the Arts

OPENS 10th JANUARY
Seattle  – Northwest Film Forum 

19th JANUARY
Portland, ME – Space Gallery

OPENS 26th JANUARY
Pelham, NY

OPENS 2nd FEBRUARY
Ottawa – ByTowne Cinema

PLEASE INVITE ALL YOU FRIENDS AND SHARE WITH OTHERS!

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Fetish Book Club | 3rd December | LA

MONTHLY GROUP FOR READERS THAT LIKE A LITTLE KINK

THIS MONTH’S SELECTION

A tale of same-sex love in early 20th-century England. It was written in 1913–1914, and revised in 1932 and 1959–1960. Although it was shown to selected friends, such as Christopher Isherwood, it was only published in 1971 after Forster’s death.

 

Forster did not seek to publish it during his lifetime, believing it unpublishable during that period. Forster was close friends with the poet Edward Carpenter, and upon visiting his Derbyshire home in 1912, was motivated to write Maurice. The relationship between Carpenter and his partner, George Merrill, was the inspiration for that between Maurice and Alec Scudder.

 

Forster resisted publication because of public and legal attitudes to same-sex love – a note found on the manuscript read: “Publishable, but worth it?” Forster was particularly keen that his novel should have a happy ending, but knew that this would make the book too controversial. However, by the time he died, British attitudes, and law, had changed. The novel has been adapted once for film and once for the stage.

 

 

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