HECTOR SILVA | Artist Focus

Rope, 2010

“If no one’s trying to censor you, then you’re probably not doing anything that important.” —Hector Silva

Amor y Luchas, 2012

I explore themes of cultural identity, because as Latinos, we are often erased from the social portrait. and then when you add being queer to that, we can really disappear. But I also think that the “positive image” strategy can be a trap, and as an artist, I feel responsible for showing art that is not only beautiful but truthful.

Los Hijos de Doña Rita, 2011

I want my work to be accessible, always giving the viewer a way into the image. I feel that ‘high art’ often excludes people, and I am strongly against that. I think art should invite people in and engage them in a conversation, aesthetic, political, philosophical, erotic, whatever.

FF #3, 2006

When I make art, my intended audience is not only the person that attends museums and galleries. I feel very strongly that art belongs in the streets. Putting art in the streets has been part of Latino culture for a long time, and we see it all the time, from murals to graffiti. I consider myself part of that tradition. I think art belongs in the street, and on the street is a lot of art.

—Hector Silva

Installation on TOM House ceiling, 2009

Hector Silva is a self-taught artist based in Los Angeles who has been producing work for more than 20 years. He is very community-oriented and was recently selected as one of Adelante‘s 20 individuals, who are among the most influential within the Latino Gay and Lesbian community, for his position as a role-model, innovative thinker, and leader in social change. Being raised in Jalisco, Mexico and now living in Los Angeles, Silva draws from the rich Latino/Chicano culture that has always surrounded him and incorporates it into his artwork. He pulls from the exposure he has had to public art, such as murals and graffiti, and appreciates the fact that it allows any person to interact with and admire it. Silva accredits religious iconography, Frida Kahlo, M.C. Escher, Tom of Finland, and Chicano prison art as his primary influences. Exploring themes of cultural identity, Silva feels a responsibility to portray not only beauty, but truth in his artwork. Today, Silva’s work is collected internationally, receiving acclaim in the US and abroad.

in 2018, Silva was inducted into Tom of Finland Foundation’s Artist Hall of Fame.

A large number of works by Hector Silva are currently on view in the TOM House Drawing Room. For tour information please call 213.250.1685

Tom of Finland Foundation is one of the largest repositories of erotic art in the world. In an effort to share what we have in our collections, we showcase different artists.

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THIS YEAR’S AWARD WINNERS

At the Annual Awards Presentation on Sunday afternoon,
2018 Achievement and Cultural Icon Awards were presented
and an induction into the
Tom of Finland Foundation’s Artist Hall of Fame.

Bottom row: Ron Athey, Sheree Rose, Slava Mogutin, Hector Silva Top row: S.R. Sharp and Durk Dehner of Tom of Finland Foundation

 


FOR ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENTS AND STEADFAST COMMITMENT TO THE ART AND CULTURE OF OUR COMMUNITY

Hector Silva – Artist Hall of Fame

Hector is a self-taught artist based in Los Angeles who has been producing work for more than thirty years. Born in Ocotlan, Jalisco, in Mexico, he moved to the United States at the age of 17. He began drawing in his late 20s when he discovered his own talent. Today, Hector’s work is collected internationally, and has received acclaim in the US and abroad. Living in LA with its rich Chicano culture, Hector draws from the Latino tradition. Among his influences are Tom of Finland, Frida Kahlo, Chicano prison art, the works of M.C. Escher, and religious iconography. Hector explores themes of cultural identity, eroticism and beauty. Hector’s mastery of light and shadow on skin is captured on paper with pencil, but he is also experienced with other media, including oil and acrylic. He draws and paints from photographic stills.


FOR ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AND IMMEASURABLE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ART AND CULTURE OF OUR COMMUNITY

Ron Athey – Cultural Icon

Ron is a Los Angeles-based artist creating work since 1981. His practice includes body-based, writing, content philosophical, AIDS-y, and esoteric terrorism. Recent works include Gifts of the Spirit, an opera developed from automatism experiments performed at the Cathedral of Vibiana in January. He has been a friend of the Foundation…forever.


FOR LEADERSHIP AND STEADFAST COMMITMENT TO THE ART AND CULTURE OF OUR COMMUNITY

Sheree Rose – Lifetime Achievement Award

Sheree is an American performance artist, photographer and cinematographer known for her work documenting the subcultures of which she is a part and collaborations with her husband Bob Flanagan. Sheree was born in 1941, earned a master’s degree at California State University, Northridge and Master of Fine Arts from the University of California, Irvine. She has been involved in feminism and the punk scene. Her practice has been based in sex politics and activism within the BDSM community.


FOR ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AND PERSONAL ACCOMPLISHMENT

Slava Mogutin – Achievement Award

Slava is an outspoken Queer artist, writer and activist. He is a New York-based Russian-American multimedia artist, author and filmmaker exiled from Russia. A third-generation writer and self-taught journalist and photographer, he became the first Russian to be granted political asylum in the US on the grounds of homophobic persecution. Informed by his bicultural literary and dissident background, Slava’s work celebrates diversity and nonconformism encompassing the themes of displacement and identity; transgression and transfiguration of masculinity and gender crossover; urban youth subcultures and adolescent sexuality; the clash of social norms and individual desires; and the tension between attachment and disaffection, hate and love. He is the author of seven books of writings in Russian, as well as three monographs of photography.


MORE IMAGES

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Hector Silva, After Dark | 7th September | LA

hs - CopyA special exhibit of artist HECTOR SILVA’s newest homoerotic collection. Known for “queering the homeboy asthetic,” Hector once again brings to life his arousing interpretations of gay latino men in his pencil drawings.

 

Invited guest artists: MIGUEL ANGEL REYES and MANUEL A. ACEVEDO.

 If no one’s trying to censor you, then you’re probably not doing anything that important.

hs - Copy (2)I explore themes of cultural identity, because as Latinos, we are often erased from the social portrait. and then when you add been queer to that, we can really disappear. But I also think that the “positive image” strategy can be a trap, and as an artist, I feel responsible for showing art that is not only beautiful but truthful.

I want my work to be accessible, to always give the viewer a way into the image. I feel that “high art” often excludes people, and I am strongly against that. I think art should invite people in, and engage them in a conversation, esthetic, political, philosophical, erotic, whatever.

When I make art, my intended audience is not only the person that attends museums and galleries. I feel very strongly that art belongs in the streets. Putting art in the streets has been part of Latino culture for a long time, and we see it all the time, from murals to graffiti. I consider myself part of that tradition. I think art belongs in the street, and on the street is a lot of art. 

 1186042_10151815509604936_383759714_n
Saturday, 8p – 4a
This is a 21+event; proper ID required.
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