Tom Pillows in Extreme Decor Magazine

This article came up in the Tom of Finland Google Alerts. The pink princess room has Tom pillows, it’s as if I designed it myself!!! We should get a copy of this issue for the archives…

 “To offset the pink, he chose black-and-white accents such as Tom of Finland toile pillows—which feature leather-clad men with whips.”

Most Absurd Quotes in New York Mag’s “Extreme Decor” Issue

Tuesday, May 10, 2011, by Sarah Firshein

Image Gallery
The bedroom in designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz’s beach house in the Rockaways, Queens.

Photos: Dean Kaufman

In a city full of extreme living—from 90-square-foot apartments to those on the market for $90M—there are only so many ways to woo New York magazine design editor Wendy Goodman. As has been previously established, one’s space must be somehow superlative, with bonus points awarded to anything designed by Annabelle Seldorf, lighting fixtures made of industrial bread tins, and rooms that include all of the following at once: Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Kelly Wearstler, Jonathan Adler, Zaha Hadid, taupe, MoMA, Wedgwood, Visionaire, platinum, and B&B Italia. Which makes the just-released Spring 2011 Design Issue—aptly named “Extreme Decor”—particularly fascinating. In it, Goodman gets a closer look at that incredible crocheted apartment we featured here on Curbed in March, as well as Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz’s beach house, Amy Sedaris’s crafting area, and fashion designer Sylvia Heisel’s crazy, black-and-white rental (first photo above). The photos above speak for themselves, but then again, so do these:

· “On the walls, Olek crocheted graphic representations of text messages from various former lovers. ‘They can be forgiven once they are crocheted,’ she says.” [link]

· “Olek’s crochet needle will stop at no item, not even leftovers in the fridge.” [link]

· “During the day, the bed is made up with a formal roll pillow with canvas wrapped around it and a giant paint-spattered bedspread.” [link]

· “When describing the living room, Nixon quotes Diana Vreeland: ‘Pink is the navy blue of India.'” [link]

· “Sedaris’s kitchen is filled with fake meat and other artificial edibles.” [link]

· “What Sedaris calls the ‘baby’s room’ is actually her crafting corner. (‘I never have children over, by the way.’)” [link]

· Sedaris’s living room contains some of her favorite pieces, including a lamp shade made with hair samples and a teacup filled with fake tea.” [link]

· “‘Pink is usually for little girls. So I thought, Why don’t we see if we can make it strong and powerful, for two men?’ Noriega-Ortiz says.” [link]

· “To offset the pink, he chose black-and-white accents such as Tom of Finland toile pillows—which feature leather-clad men with whips.” [link]

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Arts Briefs West Hollywood

Featured This Week

never alone
a Look at Tom and His Friends

Through June 26, 2011

Fri. 4:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m.

Sat.-Sun. 1 p.m.-5 p.m.

ONE Archives Gallery & Museum

626 N. Robertson Blvd.

West Hollywood

Never Alone-Presented by ONE Archives Gallery & Museum, never alone features works by artists from the Tom of Finland Foundation permanent collection.
Visit T
om of Finland Foundation for more information.

Arts and cultural affairs information and programming is brought to you by the City of West Hollywood through its Arts and Cultural Affairs Commission.
More information on the arts in West Hollywood.

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European Capital of Culture is the pedal hard on the gay imagery

Martin Rosefeldt visited the show in Turku.

Nestled in the south-west Finland, Turku Saturday became the European Capital of Culture 2011. Throughout the year art events will succeed. To begin, the medieval city of 175,000 inhabitants celebrates native son: Tom of Finland, whose real name Touko Laaksonen. Died in 1991, he was the illustrator who has revolutionized the homoerotic imagery. Under his wealth, from the 50s, at a time when homosexuality was still a crime, gay people are virile, happy and sexually very active. Sailors, uniforms, night meetings … folklore fantasized that traded under the cloak and has toured the world. Since his death, Tom of Finland came in galleries and museums.

La capitale européenne de la culture met la pédale dure sur l’imagerie gay

Nichée au sud-ouest de la Finlande, Turku est devenue samedi la capitale européenne de la culture 2011. Tout au long de l’année, les événements artistiques vont se succéder. Pour commencer, la cité médiévale de 175.000 habitants célèbre un enfant du pays : Tom of Finland, de son vrai nom Touko Laaksonen. Disparu en 1991, il est l’illustrateur qui a révolutionné l’imagerie homoérotique. Sous sa mine, dès les années 50, à une époque où l’homosexualité était encore un crime, les gays sont virils, heureux et sexuellement très actifs. Marins, uniformes, rencontres nocturnes… un folklore fantasmé qu’on s’échange sous le manteau et qui a fait le tour du monde. Depuis sa mort, Tom of Finland est entré dans les galeries et les musées.

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